Site Overlay

Why Homeschool Learning Is So Powerful

Why Is Homeschool Learning So Good For Our Kids?

It must be frustrating to be a child in an adult world. They want deep, engaging, thoughtful conversation. We want them to tell us the color of the pencil we are holding.

Garrett Kett

** This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.**

One of the great gifts of homeschool learning is deep, engaging, thoughtful conversation.

It is part of every day in most homeschool rooms.

Questions are welcome.

Student-led learning is embraced.

“Do not train children to learn by force and harshness, but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.” ~ Plato

Life is flexible.

Also, the welcome inclusion of a creative imagination set free,

can steer you in the most lovely and thought-provoking directions.

The entire world a classroom.

“Teaching children about the natural world should be treated as one of the most important events in their lives.”
~ Thomas Berry

Parents and students are both eager for contemplative questions, deep truths, and honest answers.

Even the admission of ignorance when no one in the house has the answer to a truly trying question can lead to the best discoveries.

Everyone is so anxious to find the answers from experts who are almost always surprisingly ready to address even the most difficult questions if you only have the courage to ask.

Frequent field trips to visit the experts (museums, universities, zoos, planetariums, historic sites, archivists, town historians, local newspapers, factories, tv stations, libraries, and on and on) feel like more of an adventure than a lesson.

Homeschoolers frequent museums, zoos, planetariums, historic sites, and libraries.

Experts become friends, ready to teach with passion and hands-on activities.

Ready to share their knowledge with enthusiasm.

Homeschool offers so many experiences.

Beautiful unhurried learning experiences.

“If we want our children to move mountains, we first have to let them get out of their chairs.”

~ Nicolette Sowder

One after the next.

Day after day.

Inside and outside.

Among family, friends, and often animals.

This mention of the inclusion of animals in students’ lives may seem insignificant but countless studies have proven that having animals present while learning improves recall and behavior, and reduces stress. (Click here to read a great article about the benefits of pets in the classroom.
I chose an image of a horse because as part of my son’s homeschool learning, he volunteered every Wednesday for years working with and caring for horses at Small Miracles Equestrian Center where they assist children with disabilities, Veterans suffering from PTSD, and at-risk youth. He learned so much from that experience and if we did not homeschool, he would not have been able to benefit from it as he did.

We are not teaching for the test (or the funding).

But teaching for a better tomorrow.

For a better life.

Developing character and morality as well as sharpening math skills and absorbing world history.

About 50% of homeschooled children participate in volunteer work (Source: CCHE Report)
“Kids deserve the right to think that they can change the world.” ~ Lois Lowry

“It is vital that when educating our children’s brains we do not neglect to educate their hearts.”

~ Dalai Lama

Homeschoolers learn together in our homemade lab’s, goggles on, and a fire extinguisher close at hand, and then later that same day we learn different, equally important lessons in local soup kitchens, our paring knife ready, our hearts open, grateful to serve.

One day we are building a diorama and the next a house for a family in need.

Learning how to use the compass, the calculator, the stove, the hammer, and a pen.

Knowing them each to have their own unique power.

“If the child is not learning the way you are teaching, then you must teach in the way the child learns”

~ Rita Dunn

Homeschooling is often delivered raw, exactly as a lesson originally appears, not prepared and transformed for presentation, but just real, in the moment learning that thoroughly addresses the student,

where he sits…

wondering about all the wonders in the world.

And where he sits free to ask aloud, to dig deep into the books and resources, to seek the answers.

Homeschooled children often have one problem in common. They rarely think about raising their hand and waiting for approval to ask a question. They expect their questions to be welcome and well received.

“Children grow up hearing how broken the environment is, how broken beyond repair. Plant strawberries together, make wild medicines, paint the sunrise. Show them proof that for every act of destruction, they can sow a seed, however small, of beauty.”

~ Nicolette Sowder

Learning is done every day in many different ways, and all are good.

Learning is good.

But I confess I am partial to this homeschool way above all others.

Because first and foremost what we seek to teach from home is a love of learning itself combined with an appreciation of the beautiful and unique mind and heart of our precious student(s).

And then also to empower them with tools and instill within them a desire to become an adult who is ready, willing, and able to encounter the world that needs them.

Eager to lend a helping hand.

To jump in and work hard until solutions have been achieved.

Confident and ready to make a difference.

Because they have already seen that they can change the world for the better.

Over and over again.

Day after day.

Experience after experience.

There are countless reasons that I adore this lifestyle of homeschool learning. In fact, I wrote several out in this post: My Top Ten Reasons To Homeschool.

This does not mean that homeschool learning is always bliss. It’s hard work. Really, really hard, self-sacrificial work. It is a job. And I am not going to lie, it includes fear, frustration, and burn-out (I’ve written about that too right here –Homeschool Mom Burnout is a Real Thing.) But the rewards, the experiences, the gifts it gives back make it so worth it. I wouldn’t want to live any other way.

What is your student’s favorite part of homeschool learning? What do you each see as the greatest advantages to this homeschool life we have chosen? Let me know in the comments section below. I love to hear from you.

Wishing you a life well-lived,

Gwen

Thanks for visiting Geez, Gwen today! We are so glad you found us! We are not believers in coincidence so we are confident you are here for a reason! Perhaps we can offer you tasty recipes? Maybe our inspirational quotes are just what you need in your life! Perhaps you’ve been wondering where to take that family vacation? Maybe you want to know the truth about what us homeschoolers really do all day! Maybe you love photography and see it as an art, just like me! Whatever it is, it’s clearly Destiny at its finest! Don’t let this opening door of opportunity slam shut! Run through by subscribing to our newsletter.

Some posts on this blog contain affiliate links. I receive a small commission whenever a product is purchased through these links. Occasionally I receive products in exchange for a review or giveaway post. The owner of this website, is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking http://geezgwen.com to Amazon properties including, but not limited to, amazon.com, endless.com, myhabit.com, smallparts.com, or amazonwireless.com. However, all opinions expressed on Geez Gwen are solely my own, and I only suggest products or services that I believe will be helpful to my readers.

2 thoughts on “Why Homeschool Learning Is So Powerful

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

Copyright © 2020 Geez, Gwen! All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy